HOW TO GET PUBLICITY FOR YOUR BRAND

Generating publicity for your brand, be it a start-up, SME or large-scale enterprise, is always a good idea. There are many different ways that you can put your business’ name in the public eye, but arguably one of the best methods is where the publicity is organic (i.e. it’s not an advertisement that you have paid for).

Why? Because people are more inclined to trust what is presented to them naturally. According to Nielson, 92% of people trust recommendations that are put to them by friends and family, while just under half of global consumers say that they trust newspaper and television ads. We can assume the latter is less, because people know that the advertisements are paid for and therefore the trust signals are not as strong. However, when your brand is at the forefront of the media from earned publicity – not an ad – it would be fair to suppose that this is likely to be not only more engaged with, but perceived as more reputable too.

This is, by definition, media relations – a type of PR (Public Relations) service that we offer here at the Source PR. Getting publicity for your brand and achieving that trust from potential consumers isn’t an easy job, which therefore makes it all the more worthwhile and rewarding when great coverage is achieved.

You can get publicity for your brand in many different ways, including:

  1. Show good community engagement
  2. Promote new product and service launches
  3. Give stakeholders an interesting story
  4. Provide statistics that make an engaging article
  5. Offering expert commentary to newspapers where relevant

We’ll expand on these methods below.

5 Ways To Get Publicity For Your Brand

There are a plethora of methods you can use to generate publicity, we’ve decided to explore our top five favourite tactics.

  1. Show Good Community Engagement

Building a brand reputation is as important, if not more important, than generating direct coverage for your business. Appearing in the media with product and service launches is great, but to create a brand image that will be more beneficial in the long term, you need to show your stakeholders what you’re all about. Is there something you can do as a business to support the environment, for example? Or perhaps even a local charity or organisation? Newspapers love positive stories, especially regional titles, so if there’s something you can do to create these optimistic stories (all the while building prolific CSR for your business) then you should do it – then be sure to tell the right journalists about it too so they can spread the word and generate publicity for you.

Publicity for your brand with community donations

Here’s a foodbank donation we did recently with one of our clients, it achieved lots of regional media coverage

  1. Promote New Product And Service Launches

One of the most straightforward ways of getting publicity for your brand is through promoting new product and service launches. However, media titles – both nationals and regionals – can’t cover every single launch. So, you need to make yours stand out. What can you do to make the press interested in your product or service? Perhaps you could create a bespoke launch event or thinking of an imitative way of boosting your new product, such as donating a unit for every unit sold, for example. It’s always a good idea to send your target journalists a sample of your product or service too, they’re more likely to write about something if they know it’s of a good quality.

  1. Give Stakeholders An Interesting Story

You can attract media coverage for your business if you can provide newspapers with an interesting story that they’ll want to cover, that also ties in with your brand. For example, do you have some interesting insights from your business (has a certain product seen more sales since UK lockdown) that you can share? You can test an idea out by creating a headline from your story and then asking friends or family if they’d read the article, if they’re interested, then there’s every chance a journalist will be too – so it’s well worth having a go at pitching.

  1. Provide Statistics That Make An Engaging Article

If you don’t have internal data to share you can also produce external statistics that media titles may be interested in. Could you run a study that runs parallel to the services or product that your business provides, and then sell that in as a story? You can run paid-for surveys on platforms such as YouGov, or perhaps you could conduct desk research and analyse trends to provide a great set of data that newspapers may want to write about.

  1. Offering Expert Commentary To Newspapers Where Relevant

And finally, another of our favourite ways to get publicity for brand is to give the media expert comments where relevant. If you’re a spa venue, for example, and a journalist is covering wellbeing tips to conquer stress – is that a topic you can offer extra insight to? Many writers often welcome tips and opinions from qualified people as it makes their pieces stronger, so all you have to do to generate coverage for your brand is identify these opportunities, and then be on hand to provide a comment if the journalist wants one. Often too, as these comments are provided out of goodwill, a journalist may also provide you a backlink to your website which’ll count towards improving your SEO performance. Great at attaining media coverage, high-quality backlinks and building up corporate and individual reputations, generating publicity through expert commentary is certainly a tactic we love here at The Source.

Publicity for your brand through expert commentary

Our Managing Director has been proficient in commenting on the Government’s Coronavirus communications strategy thanks to this type of outreach and reactive PR… This particular piece is in ITV News

Getting Publicity For Your Brand – It’s Not Easy!

These are just a few of our favourite tips for generating branded coverage, there are a whole host more that can be filtered into your PR strategy. If you need help in making the magic happen for your business, then please do give us a call on 01829 720 789 or contact us here for a free consultation.

Be sure to keep up with us on social too. Find us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn.

PR-ING THROUGH CORONAVIRUS: SMALL BUSINESS HELP AND ADVICE

Coronavirus has caused truly extraordinary times, the UK – as well as several other countries – is currently on a lockdown. The first of its time.

Travel has been limited to all but essential movement, many businesses (such as restaurants, non-essential retail stores and gyms) have been forced to close their doors for the foreseeable future and the healthcare industry is under perhaps its biggest strain that this generation has ever seen. Because of current climate, we can’t shy away from the fact that many businesses are struggling. Whether you’ve had to temporarily cease trading altogether, or whether your customers are less inclined to part with their money due to the uncertainty at the moment – either way most organisations are feeling the pinch one way or another.

It’s not all bad news, however.

Though the current economic climate is bleak, and though many are struggling, we have also been given the gift of something that we wouldn’t normally have: time.

Now is not the time for radio silence, now is the time to be strengthening your brand message, communicating effectively and giving back to the community wherever you’re able. Whilst some brands have taken the stance of radio silence as the Coronavirus epidemic plays out, many others have adjusted and reacted to the current climate, and have been in a better position for it.

You have time to work on your strategies, to work on your brand position and to ensure that when this comes to pass, your business will emerge bigger and better than ever before.

If you’re a small business or an SME and struggling, there are a number of ways you can help yourself during this pandemic.

Small Business Coronavirus Help: How To Support Yourself

The government has already introduced revolutionary support for small businesses. Initiatives include a small business grant funding of £10,000 for all business in receipt of small business rate relief or rural rate relief, grant funding of £25,000 for retail, hospitality and leisure businesses with property with a rateable value between £15,000 and £51,000. This is as well as the job retention scheme put in place.

While this might be a short-term solution to an otherwise unnerving situation, it’s also crucial for small businesses to think about their long-term plans too.

Below, we’ve racked our PR, Social Media and Marketing brains together to bring you the very best advice on how your business can survive through Coronavirus; how to keep marching on through these uncertain times and how to effectively retain your brand image and position.

Don’t Give Up On Your Team

First and foremost, you need to trust your team.

Unlike many business crises, we’re all in this together and there are many businesses from various industries that are all feeling the strain that Coronavirus has brought about. In most business cases, your team will be instrumental to your survival during this period, so before adjusting your business strategies, you should be providing your team with the technology and support needed to undertake their work and trust that they will continue to deliver remotely.

Trust opens the door to productivity; the more you give, the more you get back.

Keep On Communicating

Effective communication has never been more important.

You should be keeping your communication channels open. You may appear closed to the outside world but it’s important to share the business’s contingencies, its plans and any changes in service. Share your successes or small wins and remember your customers and stakeholders are interested in people-centric stories, as well as positive outcomes in otherwise difficult circumstances.

There’s a strong demand in the media for any positive news amidst all this negativity, so if your business has something good to share this might be a good way of spreading your news further afield and making sure that people are still engaged with your brand.

Adding to this, there’s a new sense of community re-emerging – if your business has changed how it operates or is supporting others, such as pubs offering delivery services to those in need, make sure you share this. Social media usage has increased by 22% since lockdown and provides an excellent community engagement tool which may prove beneficial in the longer term.

Though you may not be trading at the moment, it’s important not to lose momentum. Make sure people still remember who your business is, what you do. Whether this is by maintaining an active social media presence, writing blogs for your website or even appearing in the news – don’t let people forget you if you want to continue to operate a successful business when this storm has passed.

Adapt And Evolve With The Climate

If your business can accommodate it, adaptability is important right now.

Under new government restrictions, many businesses can no longer trade as usual. Is there a way you can overcome this, and support your community too? For example, many restaurants are now offering takeaways and are giving out free meals whilst they do so, which is great in strengthening the business’ Corporate Social Reputation.

Could you keep your cashflow afloat by encouraging your stakeholders to purchase vouchers from you that can be redeemed at a later date?

Other examples of how companies may adapt during the Coronavirus period is by taking advantage of the technology we have at our disposal.

Could you give your consumers a digital version of your product or service to retain your custom? Some housebuilders are now operating fully online house viewings, whilst organisations such as Chester Zoo are livestreaming a day at the zoo on Facebook to the masses.

If your business can think of a quirky and imaginative way to stay relevant, it will almost certainly survive this uncertain period.

Create A Contingency Plan – Prepare For The Future

Plan for your future, because if you adopt the right attitude, there almost certainly will be one.

Can you create a contingency plan for your business?

Though there are so many things uncertain at the moment, if you can begin to strategize and plan your bounce-back for when this comes to pass, you’ll be in a more favourable position when the market reopens once more. Make sure you’re well prepared.

Whilst we all have extra time on our hands, we can make the most of this: working on our websites, our SEOs, or even developing social media or PR strategies.

The most important thing to add to your contingency plan, for now and for the future, is a plan that sees your business remaining adept in its industry. Make sure that people don’t forget your brand. Whether this is by thinking of a new and imaginative way to run your business (such as the examples above), or whether it’s just making sure you upkeep a strong media presence. If your company steps into the shadows during this period, it’ll be much harder for it to re-emerge when it’s over.

Also, be prepared for radical change once more when lockdown is over and when the virus dissipates. When you can reopen your doors again, you’ll almost certainly be met with a different audience than the one you’ve come to know. After recovering from the most governed period of their lives, there’s no doubt that people will be more appreciative. They’ll want to explore more, they’ll want to travel more, they’ll want to eat out more and they’ll want to buy more things.

We’ll have a more spontaneous and obligated population on our hands, so make sure your business is prepared to accommodate them.

Do you need PR, Marketing or Social Media support for your business? Either in handling the Coronavirus outbreak, or preparing for when it’s over? Call us for a free, confidential assessment of your situation on 01829 720 789 or email louis@sourcepr.co.uk.

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THE EXPECTATIONS OF BRANDS ON SOCIAL MEDIA

In recent years, the way brands approach public relations and customer interaction has changed radically. When your ASOS or Amazon package doesn’t arrive on time, your first step might be to send a tweet or DM to their official accounts. You’re then likely to hear from a sales team member or social media intern within minutes. Some even go beyond customer service and go to great lengths to provide humorous, cutting content that quickly goes viral; Tesco seem particularly adept at this, whether that’s ribbing a guy who implied that it’s uncool to be on Tesco Mobile, making a pun about ‘hitting the hay’ during their horse meat scandal in 2013, or flippantly telling a Tweeter that they probably aren’t going on any dates this weekend.

An Era of Accountability

A brand’s presence on social media also allows people to come together as a collective to hold them accountable for a product, headline or action that is, at best, below par, and at worst, offensive or harmful. The examples are numerous: the beauty community alone has held gurus such as Jaclyn Hill accountable for hair and metal balls found in her range of lipstick, as well as Jeffree Star for similar reasons; the defamatory Pepsi commercial that featured Kendall Jenner was taken down in less than 24 hours after Twitter’s backlash; and the Advertising Standards Authority began to investigate a weight-loss pill company after its billboards asking ‘Are you beach body ready?’ sparked heated conversations online.

But just where is the line drawn when it comes to advertising? A tongue-in-cheek joke or pun on a billboard might be just that to some, but to others, it could be a sign of the way in which advertising manipulates stereotypes or the insecurity of consumers. In the age of social media and accountability, it’s great that companies find it more difficult to get away with ads that are racist, sexist or otherwise. If it weren’t for the long campaigning of women’s rights groups, for example, we’d still be seeing ads for cars flanked by bikini-clad women.

A Step Too Far…Or Simple Misjudgement?

But it’s not always so clear cut. A campaign by Brewdog in 2018 was withdrawn amid claims of sexism, yet the pink bottles of their Punk IPA – rebranded to ‘Pink IPA’, complete with a new design – underwent their makeover to promote the gender pay gap, with 20% of the profits going to charities that fight gender inequality. Nevertheless, it was deemed ostentatious and unnecessary by The Crafty Beeress, a beer industry blogger, and Labour MP Jo Stevens, who tweeted their distaste.

McDonald’s, usually an industry-leader when it comes to ad campaigns, dug a hole for themselves when they encouraged social media users to use the hashtag #McDStories back in 2012 in order to highlight their guarantee of fresh produce. Users shared their horror stories of ‘finding a fingernail’ in their Big Mac, being hospitalized for food poisoning, and losing 50lb after they stopped eating at the restaurant. The campaign – originally set out to promote something positive – was so disastrous it lasted a mere two hours.

The McDonald’s ad in particular is a stark reminder of just what can happen if the tides of social media turn against a brand. Never mind if the campaign has good intentions; it seems there’s nothing more people enjoy on social media than collectively complaining, for better or worse.

So what can businesses learn from this?

Unfortunately, it sometimes seems to be the case that campaigns are either a swing or a miss, depending entirely on how they’re perceived. Common sense dictates not to go for anything that might be provocative in terms of social justice, and yet the alternative – promoting equality – doesn’t always sit right with consumers either. Ads that are simple, punchy and effective, with no ulterior motives, seem to be the safest bet.

For advice on digital marketing and PR, give us a call on 01829 720789, or follow us on Twitter (@source_tweets), Instagram (@PRSource) and Facebook (Source PR).

HOW TO LEVERAGE AWARENESS DAYS FOR YOUR PR STRATEGY

If there’s one thing we love working on here, it’s a great PR story. After all, “advertising is saying you’re good. PR is getting someone else to say you’re good” (Jean-Louis Gassée). Just one of the ways that we secure national and regional coverage for our clients time and time again is through leveraging what are now commonly known as awareness days.

Some important, others more ‘just for a laugh’, but all totally worth incorporating into your PR & Marketing plans if frequenting the news is part of your business strategy. Awareness days are the world’s answer to celebrating pretty random things for no apparent reason. Covering everything from ‘National Pizza Day’ to ‘Faux Fur Friday’, it seems that nowadays there’s a day (or week) to champion pretty much anything.

But how, as PRs, can we work these days in our favour? Awareness days, if they fit your brand, are great to schedule into your wider strategy. However, remember that your whole PR strategy should be varied and built around different factors, don’t just focus it on one thing.

Here’s some bases you need to cover if you want to use awareness days in your communications strategy.

Know What Awareness Days The Press Like

As with pretty much any PR story, it’s not worth the paper it’s printed on if the publications you’re targeting won’t be interested in it. The same concept goes with taking advantage of awareness days, you need to make sure that journalists are actually interested in them before moving forward. Spend some time shortlisting the days you’d like to target, then research the press coverage for those days across previous years. You’ll soon get a taste of whether the media is interested in these occasions, and moreover you’ll find out which journalists tend to write about them.

For example, a quick Google search will tell you that ‘Blue Monday’ (20th January) is a popular press topic…

Blue Monday - Using Awareness Days For PR

Google is one of the best free tools at our disposable, it can be used to shape so many different PR campaigns and strategies.

But ‘National Hug A Plumber Day’ (25th April) doesn’t return so many results. This tells you it’s probably not worth centring your press strategy around that particular awareness day. (We can’t imagine why!)

Don’t Do It Just To Do It

One thing to be conscious of is not just jumping on the bandwagon with awareness days. It’s not uncommon to see journalists taking to Twitter to say they’re fed up of ‘Blue Monday’ or ‘Singles Day’ stories. They’ve gotten so popular in the last few years that now, most people take a stab at trying to get some publicity from them. With this in mind, you need to make sure you’re only using this tactic when it really aligns with your strategy. Having a clear cut plan in place means you’ll be providing a journalist with a great story that won’t be just another email directed to their ‘deleted’ folder.

Match The Awareness Days With Your Brand

Something else you need to do if using awareness days in your PR strategy, is to ensure they’re a good fit for your brand. Some occasions are pretty versatile and can be suited to any number of different industries (Random Acts Of Kindness Day (February 17th), for example) but others are clear cut for a certain type of brand.

At the end of the day, as with any PR activity, you need to make sure that your story is valuable to the reader, but is also relevant. For example, a supermarket jumping on ‘Gorgeous Grandma Day’ (23rd July) doesn’t quite make sense and it won’t help your brand feel any real PR benefit. It’s better to stick to what makes a good read, and what generates great PR value too.

Make A Good Story

Talking of good stories, that’s another thing you really need to get right if you want to make use of awareness days in your PR strategy.

A little like how it’s important to check that certain awareness days are interesting to journalists; you’ll also need to do a recce on whether the ideas you have are press-worthy too. Ultimately, you can spend weeks or even months planning an idea around a topical awareness day, but if your efforts don’t result in a good story, then it could all be for nothing.

Using Awareness Days In PR

This ‘Christmas treat’ story we did last year worked a treat, because we knew it was timely and a good, heart-warming story.

There are many different ways to check what journalists are into covering, but some of our favourites include:

  • Following journalists on social media if they have professional accounts, as you can see what kind of stories they’re interacting with and therefore get a good sense for the topics that they cover.
  • Checking your target news sites every morning, spending 10 minutes a day exploring what stories are being covered.
  • Looking at what stories are getting the most engagement on social media and through article views. A lot of journalists are KPI’ed on interactions, so if you can provide them with a story that’s likely to get them some – they should love it.
  • Use Google Trends to see what people are searching for and therefore are interested in at the moment. This free tool from Google is a great way of auditing what’s popular in the world at any given time.
  • Check past news stories which have covered similar awareness days and see if you can spot any recurring themes. For instance, if being involved with local primary schools has been popular time and time again, then that’s probably a good place to start when brainstorming ideas for your own campaigns.

If done right, awareness days can help to really boost your PR activity when incorporated into your strategy, whether you’re B2B or B2C. Not only can they help strengthen your reputation, but they can increase your news and social media presence too.

If you’re looking for a little extra help with your PR, marketing or social media, then why not chat to us about how we can help? Here at The Source we have a growing team of professionals with expertise to cover all bases, whatever your brand vision is, we’ll have a solution. Call us on 01829 720789 or send us a message today. Or, see what we get up to on social…

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PR TOP TIPS TO IMPLEMENT IN 2020

Public Relations (or PR) is said to be the second oldest profession, first implemented to spread the word about the quality and benefits of the world’s oldest profession.

The reality is that Public Relations has been around forever as people, companies or organisations look to raise their profile or the benefits of the good and services they offer.

The industry continues to evolve to reflect the changing media landscape and the ways in which audiences gather their information or are influenced by the world around them.

Despite these significant changes, much of the core principals remain the same.  We would suggest that companies large or small take stock and when looking ahead for 2020 ensure they consider the following five core pillars of success.

The five simple top tips:
  • Know your business, product or service – what are the key features or benefits and why is it different or better than others. This will help you to be clear on your proposition and what exactly you want to say.
  • Know your customers – who are you looking to influence and what are their behaviours? Your customers may be varied but map out who they are and what they do – if necessary, make plans specific to each audience.
  • Find a creative angle – Don’t be ego centric but think why is this relevant to my audiences and why is it of interest to them.
  • Share your news – if you don’t share your news then it’s unlikely that someone will do it for you. Make sure your your content is right for the platform and if targeting journalists make sure it’s relevant to them and their audiences
  • Don’t get stuck in a rut – PR and digital communications is changing rapidly and so are audience behaviours. If something does not work, try something new and different.

If you’re unsure of the best way forward, speak to an agency that is able to give you straight forward, honest advice.  We have PR, social media and digital clients across the North West, Wales and UK and our Chester PR, marketing and digital teams are available to support your business needs.

Finally, one last tip would be to be proactive.  2020 is a new year and therefore a new opportunity to make the right plans that will help take you and your business forward.

 

DIGITAL PR – SIMPLE STEPS TO BUILD PERFECT SITE

In an increasingly digital world, having a website has never been more important for the emerging brands of today. Whilst the tech-savvy amongst you may already be well-versed with the mechanics of website build, we explore some of the key factors to consider for ensuring that your website is as effective as it can be:

1. Make it accessible

In today’s increasingly fast-paced digital environment, web browsers are looking for quick answers and instant gratification. If your website is clunky and difficult to navigate, a user is quite simply not going to waste their time trying to find out exactly what it is that you offer. Make the message simple and clear from the get-go to grab your reader’s attention. If your message is complex, consider introducing the use of infographics and imagery to make the information more digestible.

2. Make it easy to find

With over 4 billion searches made on Google every single day, it is essential that you consider search engine optimisation (SEO). In layman’s terms, the key to effective SEO is to outline the keywords that you wish your website to be associated with and then to make sure that you are using them effectively throughout the site. A great way to do this is by regularly updating your blog content. This will also show readers that your website is constantly being refreshed and will encourage repeat visits.

3. Optimise for mobile

According to research carried out by TextLocal, 85% of smartphone devices are now used for internet browsing, compared to 72% of laptop devices. This shift in browsing habits means that smartphone optimisation is now one of the foundations for effective website build, as opposed to an afterthought. Where traditionally sites have been optimised for desktop during build, this trend is now changing, and many are now favouring a mobile-first approach in order to enhance the experience for smartphone users.

4. Make it personal

According to research from Accenture (2017), more than one in two consumers (56%) are more likely to shop at a retailer in store or online that recognizes them by name. Capturing customer data on your website provides a fantastic opportunity for personalising the customer experience, from sending birthday wishes through to sending recommendations based on their browsing preferences.

5. Don’t stop improving

Once your web build is complete, the journey doesn’t stop there. Websites need to be constantly monitored and updated in order to perform their very best, and a great tool for helping you to measure this performance is Google Analytics. This tool will breakdown the nitty-gritty details of your site, down to the keyword they used to find you in the first place. GA can work wonders for making those small improvements that will help guarantee that users spend a longer time browsing and engaging with your page.

6. Content is king

If you want your website to appear in the top search engine rankings, content remains king. Google and other search engines will be looking to see what ‘authority’ your site has for the search terms offered. Get the content right, populate with blogs / vlogs and articles that build credibility and authority and secure links to the site. All this helps get the all-important SEO.

If you are thinking about starting a new web project and would like any assistance with the process, then do get in touch with us.

MAKE IT, DON’T FAKE IT

Since Donald Trump’s election the term ‘fake news’ is being increasingly used to discredit all sorts of stories which people don’t agree with, from heavyweight political scandals to the quirky, more light hearted stories commonly found on social media.

So what is ‘fake news’? Essentially it’s when outlets deliberately publish hoaxes, propaganda and disinformation purporting to be real news, often using social media to drive web traffic and amplify the effect.

Why bother?  Well it’s all about generating clicks and advertising revenue, or to enhance, discredit or boost a person, policy or organisation.  Fake news can take many forms but is principally based around;

  • Disinformation: False information which is intended to mislead the audience, rather than explain the full story
  • Propaganda or spin: One-sided information, which often omits key facts or evidence which contradicts it
  • Subjective news: The presentation of one side of an argument more positively than the other
  • Infotainment: Usually stories about celebrities which are based largely on opinions rather than facts.

It could be argued that companies and media outlets have been peddling fake news for ages but the issue appears to be growing as the growth in news channels and social media platforms is pushing ‘editors’ to become more creative with their content in order to attract readers and page visits.  However, if regularly delivering fake news they risk undermining the reputation of their organisations as respected news channel.

Protect your reputation

The same applies to businesses or individuals who seek to mislead their audiences for short term gain.  If you have built up good contacts in the media, you can also quickly lose your goodwill by getting them to help spread stories about your business which aren’t strictly true.

Importantly, it can also damage a client’s authority and position as a media expert in their field and ultimately destroy the trust between your business and your customers, with obvious consequences.

We’d advise against propagating fake news but instead developing meaningful and trustworthy relationships with the media and other digital platforms that build credibility and authority in a sector or service.

Don’t issue news stories unless the story is genuinely newsworthy, which means there needs to be something about your story that makes it interesting and prompts people to read it. Think about your audience and ask why they should care about your story.  Is it something they need to know? Is it something that they need answering? Can your story help them in any way?

Also be mindful of what you like or share on social media. It’s easy to inadvertently like, retweet or share a fake news story. But if you do, you’re unwittingly helping to spread the fake news or even endorse it.

Certain sections of the PR industry are renowned for using trickery, sleight of hand and dark arts to pull the wool over people’s eyes on behalf of their clients.  But if you’ve got a good story to tell, why rely on cheap gimmicks?  At Source PR we offer straightforward, effective and most importantly honest advice.  That’s the best way to build relationships and get results without the need for fake news.

CONTENT MARKETING – HOW TO GET YOUR DIGITAL CONTENT JUST RIGHT

Unfortunately too many clients still believe that because they’ve spent hefty amounts on a new website, all will be well and the new business will roll in.  Unfortunately, it’s simply not the case as without quality, optimised and relevant content management – there’s a high chance a potentially fruitful website will wither on the vine.

The good news however is that a growing number of businesses are seeing the benefits of effective content marketing.  Recent statistics show that as many as 91% of B2B and 86% of B2C marketers use content marketing to facilitate business growth.

Although content marketing has been with us for years now it remains an effective way to build brand trust and awareness as well as establish business credentials by simply offering highly relevant information to the right target audience.

However, like other digital marketing methods it has evolved considerably over the past decade, so here we’ve outlined a few pointers as to what works best:

  • Achieve cut through and say something new, different and relevant. There are more than 2 billion blog posts listed every day, so make sure yours cuts through by being original and not ‘me too’.  If you want to be a thought leader, say something new or challenge the status quo.
  • Focus on content that you have the right to comment on – why are you experts and why should people listen to you? Don’t blag it if you don’t know what you’re talking about as that can back-fire, instead focus on an area that your business excels in.
  • Use a quality digital communication agency to provide the right copy and content – if you’re not a writer, get some help so that you can focus on what you do best. Having a nose for a good or interesting story will also help.
  • Work with partners, suppliers and friends.Building back links is a critically important element of SEO and this is a useful tactic to not only receive endorsement but build links.
  • Think how best to share your content. Although building content and links on the page is useful for SEO, if you’ve got something interesting or unusual to say why not cascade through the right social media channels or via an electronic newsletter?
  • Take a longer term view – organic content marketing won’t immediately knock you up the SEO rankings but be specific on key words and in time it will bear fruit.
  • Evaluate and evolve. Has your content achieved any inbound links, has it been shared, have you maximised the opportunity through social media/newsletters, what’s the feedback / comments, can you place the piece editorially?

As with all digital marketing campaigns, it’s important to test, evaluate, improve and evolve.  Remember to take a long-term view that’s measured against specific goals and objectives as this always delivers the best results.

If you’re looking for a reliable digital agency in Chester that uses modern content marketing strategies, contact us and let us show you what we can do.